Seigaiha (waves)

Our flagship pen case. First used in the sixth century, the seigaiha is a quintessentially Japanese pattern depicting the waves of the sea.

High technology meets hand-finishing

A combination of high technology and traditional craft, our pen case is made of a single piece of laser-cut fabric wrapped around an impact-resistant internal frame — creating the perfect housing for your pens.

The curvature of the frame and its semi-rigid construction allow the frame to deform and automatically restore itself upon impact, absorbing the forces that would otherwise damage pens housed within.

Pull the external tab to open the case; its twin on the inside prevents your pens from coming into contact with the fastener.

Separate your pens with the included friction-fit divider, or remove it entirely to accommodate larger pens.

The regular case fits pens of up to 140 mm (+2 mm tolerance), including the Lamy 2000 and most TWSBIs, while the oversize case fits pens of up to 150 mm (+2 mm tolerance).

Examples of pens that have been tested to fit the oversize case:
Montblanc 149, Pelikan M1000, Pilot Custom 845, Visconti Homo Sapiens, TWSBI Eco, Conid Regular, Kasama Una

A pattern across cultures

Originally thought to have come from ancient Persia, the seigaiha pattern entered Japan via the Silk Road in the sixth century. It gained cultural prominence in Japan as one of the key patterns kagura dancers wore during traditional Shinto ceremonies, before later entering use by the wider populace.

Formed of three crescents stacked atop one another, the pattern represents the open sea and its waves, and in Japanese culture is thought to symbolise gratitude for the bounties of the sea and a wish for a peaceful life.